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  1. #1
    hero4dohl's Avatar
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    Default [ASK] bout "flour"

    i just found out that flour was pronounced "flauer" the same as flower...

    So far, i always pronounce it "flo:r"

    i was surprised and would like to ask anyone about this case...

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  3. #2

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    Perhaps it's only dialects matters( British or American ).

  4. #3
    Volcanflame's Avatar
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    Yeah, it's spelled like /flower/ from what I've learned. But it may differ in some places.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by hero4dohl View Post
    i just found out that flour was pronounced "flauer" the same as flower...

    So far, i always pronounce it "flo:r"

    i was surprised and would like to ask anyone about this case...

    yep, it is exactly and absolutely the same as flower.

    notice this:

    flower/'flawə(r)/
    flour/flowə(r)/

    I looked up the dictionary for the phonetic symbol just to make sure about what I believed so far (I spelled both words /flowə(r)/ )

    extra explanation: why do I put parentheses among the "r"?? because of the different accent. American people will most likely spell it with "r", however Englishman without.

    ^^ CMIIW

  6. #5
    SvN's Avatar
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    there is a little difference between flour and flower
    if you try to differ it, you'll find it when you pronounce "w" n "u"
    flawer, flauer
    Want this shirt ?? Contact me :)

  7. #6

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    hmm, to avoid any misspell..I always use the speech section in control panel. Try it...It is able to spell every word you type in..


  8. #7
    reb3llist's Avatar
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    Flour as in 'flower' is the British pronunciation

    Flour as in 'flar' is American pronunciation

    I think

  9. #8
    GodSlayerZzZ's Avatar
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    i think its Just a sPell Problem or see How the words use it..

  10. #9

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    well, I think English has many words with the same pronounciation, what we have to do is to see the context where the words may occur

  11. #10
    Renzonokuken's Avatar
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    Flour and Flower are homophones

    U don't need to differentiate it, just spell it [flawə(r)]
    The difference ,though, is on the intonation.

    flower/'flawə(r)/
    flour/flowə(r)/

    Notice the 'f and f, in flower, we denote the initial f while flour we don't denote it, just normal pronunciation


    I looked up into many dictionary like Webster [ Merriam - Webster ] and Oxford Dictionary, Wordweb Dictionary, Cambridge and outsources.

  12. #11

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    its much harder when u spell it in british accent

  13. #12

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    Only tones differ them.

    flower: flaw.er

    flour: flawer

    They have identical pronunciation, but different tones.

  14. #13

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    The method of reading flour depends on the accent, normal english accent will read flour as " f l a e r ", which mostly correct for normal accents, not sure about british though..

  15. #14

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    i think its just a spell problem and the accent from another country

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